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20121201
20121231
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his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> pelley: well, a lot of families with tight budgets will be happy to hear this next story: the housing market is coming back. we got a report today that says home prices in october had their biggest gain in six years. up more than 6%. sales have been rising, too. we haven't seen news like this since the housing meltdown. bill whitaker shows us what it looks like in southern california. >> reporter: los angeles contractor steve andolin routinely has five or six houses under construction before the crash. the recession cut that in half. what are you seeing as far as this market? >> well, definitely an improvement in sale price. prices are going up. >> reporter: he's now hiring more builders, plumbers, electricians, jobs that in l.a. pay $25 to $40 an hour. >> people were scared before and now people have a little bit more confidence and are willing to act. >> reporter: perhaps even feeling pressure to buy. elana giplable has been house hunting for more than a year. she's noticed something new, competition. >> you feel
portions of new york. south of there, all along the i- 95 corridor through new york and philly and d.c. and south of there, very heavy rain occurring this evening, and that's going to be the story overnight. and it looks like even into tomorrow that heavy rain is likely going to continue. >> axelrod: how bad will this disrupt travel? >> well, i think the big problem is going to be the snowfall in the inland areas. let's give an idea of how much more snow could fall between now and early saturday when the storm ends. those purple areas you see anywhere from northern pennsylvania, covering much of upstate new york, and northern new england, could see over a foot or more, maybe even locally two feet of snow in some of the higher elevations. if you take a look at the i-95 area, though, only maybe a very light amount of snow, an inch or so, in the cities. that looks like it's mainly going to be rain. but even all that heavy rain into tomorrow morning is likely going to slow down air traffic, and i think today's delays are probably going to fold over into tomorrow, as well. >> axelrod: dav
on the east and gulf coasts, including new york, baltimore, miami and houston. the ports handle nearly 50% of all oceangoing container shipments to the united states. some estimate a shutdown could cost a billion dollars a day in delayed shipments and lost work along the supply chain. independent truck driver jose espinoza hauls shipments in and out of houston's port. >> next week, it means i'm going to be out of business. that's because if i don't work, i don't get paid. bottom line is, everybody is worried about it. and if the strike happens, we're going to be in trouble, financially speaking. >> reporter: there are just two days left for both sides to negotiate here, jeff. the contract expires 12:01 a.m. sunday, but 100 companies have asked the president to intervene if talks fail. >> glor: so, anna, how exactly would the president intervene? >> reporter: jeff, federal law allows the president to intervene in a labor dispute if it's declared a national emergency. now, president george w. bush used that power in 2002 to end an 11-day lockout of dock workers on the west coast, a lockout
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